Trifles

Trifles

Trifles, written by Susan Glaspell, is the unique perspectives of the two different genders on the same issue. As suggested by its title, the central theme of Trifles is that things dismissed by some as trivial and insignificant (“trifles”) often are very important. Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters, restricted mainly to the kitchen, pay close attention to all they encounter while in the Wright residence. Through this careful attention they are able not only to determine Mrs. Wright did indeed murder her husband, but also the events leading up to the murder and subsequently Mrs. Wrights motive.
From the beginning of the play, a difference is seen between how the women approach the Wright home and how the men, who are “supposed” to determine guilt and motive, handle their investigation. The mens handling of the investigation is sloppy. The day before the Peters, the Hales, and the county attorney visit the Wright home, this loose way of investigating and interpreting police procedure is already apparent. The sheriff explains to the county attorney that because of a “man who went crazy,” the police department was unable to properly secure the Wright residence upon the discovery

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