Brave New World

Brave New World

As man has progressed through the ages, there has been,
essentially, one purpose. That purpose is to arrive at a utopian
society, where everyone is happy, disease is nonexistent, and strife,
anger, or sadness are unheard of. Only happiness exists. But when
confronted with Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, we come to realize
that this is not, in fact, what the human soul really craves. In fact,
Utopian societies are much worse than those of today. In a utopian
society, the individual, who among others composes the society, is
lost in the melting pot of semblance and world of uninterest.
In the science fiction book Brave New World, we are confronted with a
man, Bernard Marx. Bernard is inadequate to his collegues. So he
resorts to entertaining himself most evenings, without the company of
a woman. This encourages his individual thought, and he realizes that
independent thought is rewarding, and that he must strive to become a
real individual. Although this is true to a certain extent, Bernard
does not realize that he would much rather attain social recognition.
At least, not until the opportunity presents itself. Thus, through a
series of events, Bernard uses the curiosity of

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