Neurosis Versus Stability

Neurosis Versus Stability

Neurosis Versus Stability

Since the beginning of the nineteenth century, the voice of women in the civilized world has steadily grown. The twentieth century showed further gender equality by the granting of womens suffrage, whereas previously voting rights were limited to the male population. The inspirational women who led this and similar movements were critical to the development of our modern societies. In Ibsens A Doll House and Marquezs One Hundred Years of Solitude, the respective authors indirectly characterize the females as stable and independent by contrasting them against the compulsive and solitary males.
To understand the female role in the developing societies presented by Ibsen and Marquez, one must be familiar with the most prevalent stereotype provided by history: Males have more influence over females due to the physical, economic, and governmental power that they hold. In these books we see a broad range of male characters that have power. Colonel Aureliano Buendia and Don Apolinar Moscote are prime examples of physical and governmental dominance in One Hundred Years of Solitude, while Torvald Helmer is the character chosen by Ibsen to display the economic aspect of power associated with masculinity. As for the women, their role

torvald, one, nora, money, male, colonel, women, marquez, years, torvald?s, power, males, ibsen, females, children, ursula, solitude, seventeen, role, physical, little, independent, hundred, house, first, during, century, woman, war, towards, society, societal, seen, presented, play

Leave a reply

Your email adress will not be published. Required fields are marked*