Dear Honorary Mrs Gladys Berejiklian

Dear Honorary Mrs Gladys Berejiklian,

I am writing to you today regarding the issue on Shark Culling. My name is Anindita Ray, a concerned local who disagrees with the NSW surfers that shark cullings. I hope you take my perspective into consideration on this critical matter.

Firstly, Sharks play a vital role in the marine ecosystem. Sharks are prime predators. When the food chain is tampered with at any level, disastrous effects are sure to follow, especially when the top of the food chain is impacted. Sharks keep the populations below them in check. Without these controls other species would grow beyond sustainable levels, eventually resulting in suffocating the oceans. From the top right down to phytoplankton, each level is vital to the ocean’s very existence. And here’s something that you probably already know: we need the ocean to survive.

Secondly, Lastly, Sharks behave this way, it’s natural and it’s bound to happen. Sharks will wander through their natural habitat, and sometimes they’ll get a sudden surprise from a human. At this point the shark will either decide to move along without further interaction or he might decide to take a bite. Sharks don’t share the same abilities as us when it comes to observation. They need to bite, which is just an unfortunate truth, given their power and sharp teeth. Then consider the impact of the depleting natural food sources for sharks caused by humans’ overfishing. What are sharks forced to do? They’re forced to find new feeding grounds – some of them try closer to shore where fish stocks can be plentiful and there’s an enticing array of scents and vibrations caused by frolicking humans attracting them there. So who’s really to blame here?

Intro: Introduce self : reconsider – less culling – Why – against shark culling .

Reason: Play vital roles in the marine ecosystem – prime predators – if food chain tampered with (any level) – disastrous effects follow. Population in check. No sharks = too many other species = suffocation oceans (end result). Top to plankton – vital to existence. ocean = survival.

Since 2008, fisheries data shows that a total of 54 great white sharks have been culled by the programs in NSW and Queensland. The nets also inadvertently killed 13 endangered grey nurse sharks during this period

Sharks play a vital role in the marine ecosystem. Sharks are prime predators. When the food chain is tampered with at any level, disastrous effects are sure to follow, especially when the top of the food chain is impacted. Sharks keep the populations below them in check. Without these controls other species would grow beyond sustainable levels, eventually resulting in suffocating the oceans. From the top right down to phytoplankton, each level is vital to the ocean’s very existence. And here’s something that you probably already know: we need the ocean to survive.