River Symbolism In Huck Finn

River Symbolism In Huck Finn

The Mississippi River is a crucial symbol of freedom in the novel, ?Huckleberry Finn? by Mark Twain. It provides an escape for Huck and Jim from the restrictions of society and from civilization. This symbol has a great significance to the story?s plot as well as its structure.
As Huck and Jim set off down the river, it moves freely, fluidly and smoothly, and yet it is fast-paced. This represents the way the two characters are feeling at the time, free from society?s grip and able to quickly change their views and attitudes about each other. However, images of society are given along side the sides of this river, even though Huck and Jim are trying to escape them. Jim especially sees the river as a method of freedom, because his whole life he has been restricted even more than Huck or Tom have. Both characters regardless enjoy the rush they get when they travel down the river on their raft of sovereignty.
Because they do not have to answer to anyone?s demands, Huck and Jim take pleasure in having the river take them away to their freedom. However, the outside world tries

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