The Ending Of Huck Finn

The Ending Of Huck Finn

Many who read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn find the ending to be the weakest part of the novel. They argue that it is too coincidental and that Tom?s crazy, quixotic schemes conflict with the seriousness of Jim?s predicament. However, I disagree with that claim, and consider the ending to be one of the most entertaining parts of the novel.
Critics of the ending of the novel argue that it is too coincidental, and I can agree somewhat with this claim. The King and the Duke sell Jim to a farmer named Silas Phelps. Huck goes to the farm to try to figure out a way to free Jim, only to discover that the Phelps are the aunt and uncle of Tom Sawyer, who just happens to be arriving to visit them on that very day. It seems a little farfetched, but it?s not the only happenstance that occurs in the novel. For example, while Huck and Jim were still back on Jackson?s Island, they found a house floating by with a dead man in it. Jim quickly covered up his ghastly face to keep Huck from seeing it, but later reveals that the

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