The Death Of A Salesman

The Death Of A Salesman

Arthur Miller?s ?Death of a Salesman? challenges the idea of the American Dream. Willy Loman represents a uniquely typical American figure as the traveling salesman, who realizes the disenchantment with the American Dream because it fails him and his sons. The death of this particular salesman raises the issues concerning the significance and value of the American dream of success.
Miller portrays the Lomans as an average all American family. He does this with the setting of middle class suburbia as well as with the dialogue. The house is described as ?small, fragile-seeming home? with the kitchen as the center of the household. It could be anyone?s home, in any neighborhood in America. Additionally, the dialogue of the play includes a lot of American slang: gee, Pop, babe, flunk and knock ?em dead, and the dialect of ?coulda?, ?woulda?, and ?gotta? are also typically American. This is very effective depicting the Lomans as an everyday American family.
Willy and Linda Loman attempt to achieve their own version of the American Dream. Their lives are full of monthly payment to pay for possessions that

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