Symbolism In To Kill A Mockingbird

Symbolism In To Kill A Mockingbird

Symbolism is indeed used extensively throughout Harper Lee?s timeless classic, To Kill A Mockingbird. Many of the main ideas and points were put across through hidden meanings and phrases. Some examples of symbols in this book include the occurrences of the rabid dog, the fire at Miss Maudie?s house, and the extended symbol of the mockingbird. This paper will explore the usage and significance of symbolism in this novel.
The connection between innocent people and mockingbirds is made openly throughout the book. ?Mockingbirds don?t do one thing? but sing their hearts out for us. That?s why it?s a sin to kill a mockingbird,? states Miss Maudie when explaining to Scout what her father meant by saying it is a sin to shoot a mockingbird. These lines are the source of the novel?s title and introduce one of the key images of the book. This image is of innocent people who are destroyed by evil. Mr. Underwood associates Tom Robinson?s trial and murder to ?the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children.? Similarly, Boo Radley never intends to harm anyone. Instead, he leaves presents for Jem and Scout, covers Scout with a blanket the night of the fire, and eventually

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