Antony van Leeuwenhoek

Antony van Leeuwenhoek

The biologist I chose to report on is Antony van Leeuwenhoek. I
chose to report on him because he made many great microscopic
discoveries. Those discoveries include bacteria, free-living and
parasitic microscopic protist, sperm cells, blood cells, and many
more.
Leeuwenhoek was born on October 24, 1632, in Delft. His
mother?s family were brewers and his father was a basket-maker.
Antony was taught at Warmond and lived with his uncle in
Benthuizen. He got his first job in a linen-draper?s shop, in 1648. In
1654, he moved back to Delft, where he lived the rest of his life. He
set up a drapery business for a while, but also worked as a surveyor,
wine assayer, and a minor city official. In 1676, he was the trustee of
a famous painter named Jan Vermeer. In 1668, Leeuwenhoek
learned to grind lens and used them to make simple microscopes.
Robert Hooke was his inspiration to use microscopes.
Ten out of five hundred of Leeuwenhoek?s scopes have survived
up until today. His microscopes were basically a strong magnifying
glass and not compound like the ones used today. Leeuwenhoek?s
scopes were composed of only one lens, mounted in a tiny hole, in
the brass plate. The brass plate

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