Collision Aviodance

Collision Aviodance

Collision Avoidance: ADS-B or TCAS March 7, 2000 INTRODUCTION Background Collision avoidance is something that has been a problem in aviation for a long time. Most of the flights conducted today rely on the see and avoid concept and ground radar. Both of which have their flaws. The FAA predicts that mid-air collisions will increase by 300% over the next 20 years due to the increase in flights being flown by all areas of the aviation community (Kraus xiv). Civil aircraft have had onboard protection from midair collisions only since 1990 and general aviation aircraft are not required to have any collision avoidance technology onboard(www.cassd.org 1). In order to effectively manage the national airspace system in the future we will need to implement Free Flight. Free Flight is a concept designed to enhance safety and efficiency of the airspace by allowing aircraft to choose their own route instead of using victor airways (www.ads-b.com 1). Along with this freedom there is still the problem of aircraft separation which when on an instrument flight plan is air traffic controls (ATC) responsibility. In free flight there may be areas where ATC cannot give the required collision avoidance necessary. In order to safely manage

aircraft, tcas, ads-b, traffic, collision, avoidance, system, information, required, equipped, separation, ground, display, areas, ii, flight, disadvantages, air, pilots, need, advantages, unnecessary, technology, surveillance, resolution, reduced, one, main, increase, free, faa, controllers, broadcast, both, airspace

Leave a reply

Your email adress will not be published. Required fields are marked*