21 Minutes Of Hell

21 Minutes Of Hell

Twenty- One Minutes of Hell
Abstract

On March 31, 1993, Flight 46E departed Anchorage about 1224 local time. The flight release/weather package provided to the pilots by, Evergreen operations contained a forecast for severe turbulence and reports of turbulence by other large airplanes at 2,500 feet while climbing out from runway. After takeoff, at an altitude of about 2,000 feet, Flight 46E experienced an un-commanded left bank, the air speed fluctuated about 75 knots from a high of 245 knots to a low of 170 knots. Shortly thereafter engine separated from the airplane. Several witnesses on the ground reported that the airplane experienced several severe pitch and roll oscillations before the engine separated. The flight crew declared an emergency and initiated a large radius turn to the left to return and land on runway. Where an uneventful landing was accomplished at 1245.

Twenty- One Minutes of Hell

On March 31, 1993, the No. 2 engine and engine pylon separated from Japan Airlines, Inc. flight 46E, a Boeing 747-121, which had been wet-leased from Evergreen International Airlines, Inc., shortly after departure from Anchorage International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska. The accident occurred about 1234 Alaska Standard Time. The flight was a scheduled cargo flight from

flight, engine, turbulence, anchorage, aircraft, pylon, 46e, severe, crew, about, safety, board, area, tower, meteorological, knots, b-747, separated, pilots, international, anc, airport, accident, weather, several, runway, reported, low, however, forward, document, altitude, alaska, airplane, air

Leave a reply

Your email adress will not be published. Required fields are marked*