Invisible Man

Invisible Man

Invisible Man Introduction Invisible Man, written in 1952 by Ralph Ellison, documents a young black mans struggle to find identity in an inequitable and manipulative society. During the course of this struggle, he learns many valuable lessons, both about society and himself, through his experiences. Short Plot/Character Analysis/Themes The story begins with the narrator recounting his memories of his grandfather. The most remarkable, and eventually the most haunting, of these is his memory of his grandfathers last words in which he claims to have been a traitor to his own people and urges his son to “overcome em with yeses, undermine em with grins, agree em to death and destruction, let em swoller you till they vomit or bust wide open.” These words remain imprinted in the narrators mind throughout the book, although he never fully understands their meaning. His grandfathers words eventually serve as catalyst for his subsequent disillusionments, the first of which occurs directly after he graduates from high school. At this time, the narrator is invited to give a speech at a gathering of the towns leading white citizens. The speech he is planning to give expresses the view that humility is the essence of progress. Subconsciously,

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