Himavant

Himavant

Himavant?
T.S. Eliot?s unique approach to postwar decay and redemption in The Waste Land has left readers stunned. Eliot goes into many descriptions of ?unreal? cities that continuously go through a cycle of destruction, rebuilding and then destruction again. Towards the end of the novel, a description of a horrid wasteland that seems to have no hope goes through a transformation back into a flourishing land, like an unreal city.
The sacred river of the India?s, the Ganges, which provides nature with its necessary resources to survive, has sunken to the point that everything is dying. As life withers away, there is a glimpses of hope as ?the black clouds / gathered far distant, over Himavant?. According to the British National Library the Buddhists refer to the Himalayas, which lie to the north of the Ganges, as the ?Himavant?. The reference of the Himalayas is important because of its power. This mighty power holds the key to the life in the wasteland, since it is what feeds the river, which revives the withered life. High above the mountains, the powerful thunder starts and through its speech it can ?give,? ?sympathize? and ?control? over

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